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Articles / 2011

Pediatrician joins family health center

Camarillo Acorn
Friday, 02/04/2011
by Roxanne Estrada

Maya Bose Vinod said being a mother of two and practicing medicine in other countries has made her a better, more caring doctor.

The Camarillo resident said motherhood helps her to understand what it takes to care for her young patients and to communicate more effectively with parents.

“Being a mom myself, I’m able to see from a parent’s perspective, so I take every concern seriously,” said Bose Vinod, the new pediatrician at Community Memorial Health System’s Center for Family Health in Camarillo.

“When I’m taking care of my kids, I know the challenges in having optimal nutrition at home and making healthy choices, so I understand it takes time and discipline,” said Bose Vinod, whose children are 5 and 7 years old.
A native of India who grew up in the United Arab Emirates, Bose Vinod learned from her father, a physican, about the world of medicine at an early age.

“I grew up seeing patients and my father really enjoyed being a doctor, and so I give the credit to him for having influenced me,” said Bose Vinod.

From the time she decided to become a doctor, Bose Vinod knew she wanted to help children. She pursued an emphasis in pediatrics, the general care of babies and children, at a medical school in India.

“I love being with kids,” she said. “It’s very difficult to see sick kids, but once you do everything you can for them, the satisfaction you get out of it is even better.”

Following her medical training in India, Bose Vinod continued her schooling in Australia and worked as a family practice doctor for one year in Singapore.

She said her travel experience as a doctor taught her many types of healing and medicine. She uses her diverse background in her practice because the United States is so multicultural, she said.

“When you work in different settings and see different cultures and communities, it helps you understand how different people think and how people view your advice,” she said.

While studying in a variety of countries, Bose Vinod said, she also developed an interest in holistic alternatives to traditional medicine. She often suggests her patients use homeopathic medicine and healing treatments such as chiropractic therapy.

Bose Vinod said she applied to work at the Camarillo-based health center because it’s a family-based practice and an easy commute from her Camarillo home.

“I always love working in a small- town area,” she said. “People are more receptive and communicate more with me so we can make the decisions together.”

As one of the 60,000 members of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Bose Vinod said she makes a point to stay up-to-date on the most advanced methods of care for children. Pediatrics has evolved from child rearing and infectious diseases to nutrition for obesity and behavioral problems, she said.

“She brings a very special commitment to kids that goes above and beyond the average pediatrician,” said Steve Jones, medical director for the Centers of Family Health. “She is a very hard worker, and we consider ourselves very lucky.”

Bose Vinod said she thinks Camarillo residents should have more resources for counseling and psychological support for children because she has seen a growing number of children with stress-related problems, especially in the down economy.

“Parental involvement is absolutely necessary for optimal childhood development,” Bose Vinod said. “It’s important a child has at least one person they can speak with and communicate with on a daily basis because emotional well-being translates to physical well-being.”

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